We've All Been There
womenwhokickass:

Brittney Griner: Why she kicks ass
She is a 23 year old,  6 feet 8 inches tall, professional basketball player who currently plays for the Phoenix Mercury of the Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA).
"There are a whole lot of ways to be a woman."
She was the first NCAA basketball player ever to score 2,000 points and block 500 shots, and has won two Naismith trophies.
In 2012 she was named the AP Player of the Year and the Most Outstanding Player of the Final Four, and was granted the Best Female Athlete ESPY Award.
In 2009, Griner was named the nation’s #1 high school women’s basketball player by Rivals.com, featured on the cover of ESPN’s Rise Magazine, was selected by the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association as the 2009 State Farm/WBCA High School Player of the Year.
She was the the first person to dunk twice in a single WNBA, on her debut game.
She has a Nike contract that will allow her the freedom to  wear menswear apparel (something that has never been done before.)
“I knew once I went pro that I wanted to come out because I wanted to work with LGBT youth — to let them know it’s OK. To younger girls and boys I would say, ‘It’s never too late — you can come out at your own time’, but it’s definitely rewarding knowing you can be who you are and have a good support group around you. It makes your life 100 times better.”

womenwhokickass:

Brittney Griner: Why she kicks ass

  • She is a 23 year old,  6 feet 8 inches tall, professional basketball player who currently plays for the Phoenix Mercury of the Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA).
  • "There are a whole lot of ways to be a woman."
  • She was the first NCAA basketball player ever to score 2,000 points and block 500 shots, and has won two Naismith trophies.
  • In 2012 she was named the AP Player of the Year and the Most Outstanding Player of the Final Four, and was granted the Best Female Athlete ESPY Award.
  • In 2009, Griner was named the nation’s #1 high school women’s basketball player by Rivals.com, featured on the cover of ESPN’s Rise Magazine, was selected by the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association as the 2009 State Farm/WBCA High School Player of the Year.
  • She was the the first person to dunk twice in a single WNBA, on her debut game.
  • She has a Nike contract that will allow her the freedom to  wear menswear apparel (something that has never been done before.)
  • “I knew once I went pro that I wanted to come out because I wanted to work with LGBT youth — to let them know it’s OK. To younger girls and boys I would say, ‘It’s never too late — you can come out at your own time’, but it’s definitely rewarding knowing you can be who you are and have a good support group around you. It makes your life 100 times better.”

gaywrites:

The lawyer who defended Proposition 8 before the Supreme Court apparently has a gay daughter — and seeing her happy with another woman is helping him change his mind on marriage equality.

Attorney Charles Cooper reportedly learned that his daughter is gay while he was still handling the pivotal Prop 8 case. Like many politicians before him (er, the president, a while back) he says his views on marriage equality are “evolving,” but he has publicly stated he’s happy to be helping his daughter plan her upcoming wedding in Washington, D.C. He’s also not the first public figure whose views change after a child comes out.

"My views evolve on issues of this kind the same way as other people’s do, and how I view this down the road may not be the way I view it now, or how I viewed it ten years ago," Cooper said in journalist Jo Becker’s book "Forcing the Spring: Inside the Fight for Marriage Equality." …

"My daughter Ashley’s path in life has led her to happiness with a lovely young woman named Casey, and our family and Casey’s family are looking forward to celebrating their marriage in just a few weeks," he said.

Now that’s a pretty cool turnaround. Wishing him the best in his “evolution,” and a happy wedding day for all. 

picklenutpie:

Picked up our license!

picklenutpie:

Picked up our license!

gerileigh:

Just got asked by the most beautiful lady if I would marry her legally! Adding to my collection of wedding rings is this beautiful tree ring she bought me ❤️❤️❤️

We’re already married, but not legally. Yesterday I asked my beautiful wife to legally marry me on our real weddings anniversary in May. I didn’t propose the first time so I thought it only fitting propose this time.

gerileigh:

Just got asked by the most beautiful lady if I would marry her legally! Adding to my collection of wedding rings is this beautiful tree ring she bought me ❤️❤️❤️

We’re already married, but not legally. Yesterday I asked my beautiful wife to legally marry me on our real weddings anniversary in May. I didn’t propose the first time so I thought it only fitting propose this time.

queerbits:

Yes, FCKH8, this means that asexuals and pansexuals and non-binary identities are completely and totally real. Sorry we made you Google such scary words.

queerbits:

Yes, FCKH8, this means that asexuals and pansexuals and non-binary identities are completely and totally real. Sorry we made you Google such scary words.

Aderonke’s family was killed and she was arrested, tortured, and sentenced to death in Nigeria – because she’s a lesbian. She fled to safety in the UK.

Now, they’re trying to send her back into danger. Aderonke, like dozens of other LGBT asylum-seekers, is stuck in a process that the UK government has already admitted humiliates and abuses them. It doesn’t work or protect anyone.

But, if thousands of us speak out right now, we could get the Home Office to take the next step and halt the deportations. Will you sign the petition to Home Office Secretary Theresa May now?

zitadevi:

Oh my god lesbian weddings always make me crryyy!!! This one is so cute I’m going to die!!!

policymic:

"Masculinity is a trait, not a gender"

In an effort to both allocate space for and document the existence of masculine women, photographer Meg Allen created a powerful series of portraits for an exhibit at Cafe Gabriela in Oakland, Calif.